7.8 demonstrative pronouns

Demonstrative pronouns have different functions.
summary
1) the function to point to something
 

This function we rarely use because in general it leads to misunderstandings. If you are in a bakery and you want a certain type of cake you can of course say 'I want this one' and point with the finger to the cake you want. But normally this leads to a conversation like that.

A: I want this cake.
B: This one?
A: No, the one on the right.
B: This one?
A: No, below this one, the brown one.
B: Ah, the chocolate cake, why you didn' t say that before.

  2) the demonstrative adjective stresses the singularity of something
 

a) I want this bicycle.
b) I want the bicycle.
c) I want a bicycle.

The demonstrative adjective does not only point to something, but points out the singularity of something. Only a) expresses the idea that he doesn't want just any bicycle, but a very special one.

  3) the demonstrative pronoun point to an idea
 

Have a look at this sentence.

I don' t like that.
I don' t know that.

That points to an idea. (I don' t like that he interrupted his studies to go on holidays.)

If you point to a single noun you use in general the pronoun it.

A: Do you like the house?
B: Yes, I like it.

  4) this / these <=> that <=> those
 

With demonstrative pronouns you can describe temporal or local closeness / distance.

At that time we realized that there was a problem.
At these days, it's all about creativity.







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